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Safety Tips and Stories

Massage Therapy

April 25th, 2021

I had been doing investigations for about fourteen years before I was presented with a unique opportunity on a possible adultery case. I was at home when my boss called me and asked me to speak to a m...

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100 Things a Private Investigator Can Do

April 19th, 2021

Find a current address Find historical addresses Find a date of birth Identify known aliases Identify and/or confirm a Social Security number Locate birth records Locate death records Locate marriage ...

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Parking Lot Safety

April 16th, 2021

Parking lot safety should have a high awareness for customers, workers, and owners; they can be a safety risk for anyone, especially in poorly lit areas. When returning to your vehicle, especially if...

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Employee Theft

April 16th, 2021

            Dealing with employee theft can be a disheartening and complicated situation. However, there are ways to make a bad situation easier, depending on how it is handled; you also want to make ...

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Personal Security

April 11th, 2021

            Personal security is a topic that is generally at the forefront of everyone’s mind, especially in the current social climate. Knowing how to protect yourself, your loved ones, and your ass...

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Massage Therapy

I had been doing investigations for about fourteen years before I was presented with a unique opportunity on a possible adultery case. I was at home when my boss called me and asked me to speak to a man who suspected that his spouse was cheating on him at her place of business.

 

I met with him and obtained a picture of his wife, his wife’s work schedule and location. We discussed my rates and retainer. He was really concerned about his spouse cheating on him because of the kind of work she did. She was a masseuse at a Chinese massage parlor.

 

A couple of days later I made my first appearance at the massage parlor and I was pleasantly surprised that she was the one who greeted me and guided me to a room for a massage. She instructed me to disrobe and lay down with a towel over the mid-section of my body. She turned some soft music on, dimmed the lights and left the room.

 

For a moment, I wasn’t sure she was going to be the one that came back; however, she was. She was a very beautiful woman and gave a very nice massage. Her English wasn’t that great, but she understood me and I understood her fairly well. She appreciated her tip and gave me her information after I asked if she took requests.

 

During the following five weeks, I made two appointments a week. Every appointment seemed to me more erotic and sensual; I’m not sure, but I think I was really beginning to enjoy my visits with her. None-the-less, it didn’t matter how much I tipped her, or whether or not I tipped her before or after the massages. The highest tip I gave her was a hundred dollars; I gave her a hundred dollar tip on three occasions.

 

I felt like I was getting to know her pretty well because she did speak about her personal life on every visit; as did I. On my last visit with her I asked her if she was attracted to me at all. She replied kindly, yet she reminded me she was married. After all that time, exchange of money and sensuality, I knew that I wasn’t going to close the deal with any happy endings.

 

I asked her why such a beautiful married woman was willing to work in a massage parlor? She informed me she was going to college to learn American customs better and that she hoped that her husband would teach her to drive soon so that she could start working in a Chinese restaurant or retail.

 

All in all, I could not prove that she was having any kind of affair at work with any co-workers or clientele. However, I knew I certainly gave it a valiant effort. I contacted her husband and informed him that he should really communicate with his wife better because she didn’t really want to work there and that she just felt like she had to because that’s where he was taking her. I forgot to ask if she had any single sisters. LOL.

 

 

Bryan L., OK

For more tips, please follow us here: www.triplejinvestigations.com 

Johnny James,

Owner / CEO

100 Things a Private Investigator Can Do

  1. Find a current address
  2. Find historical addresses
  3. Find a date of birth
  4. Identify known aliases
  5. Identify and/or confirm a Social Security number
  6. Locate birth records
  7. Locate death records
  8. Locate marriage records
  9. Locate divorce filings
  10. Dig through someone’s trash
  11. Locate a beneficiary for a probate proceeding
  12. Research current and / or historical property holdings
  13. Identify mortgage information
  14. Identify secured lenders
  15. Identify related party property transactions
  16. Determine current market value of real property
  17. Locate bankruptcy filings
  18. Retrieve and analyze bankruptcy records
  19. Uncover improper relationships
  20. Locate federal civil lawsuits
  21. Locate federal criminal records
  22. Retrieve and analyze federal civil and criminal records
  23. Retrieve mug shots from arrest records
  24. Provide independent analysis
  25. Locate state and local criminal arrest records
  26. Retrieve and analyze review criminal records
  27. Provide peace of mind
  28. Locate home phone numbers
  29. Locate cell phone numbers
  30. Identify owner of home or cell phone number
  31. Determine owners of corporation
  32. Retrieve and analyze corporate records
  33. Locate current or former executives
  34. Interview current or former executives
  35. Find and retrieve judgment and lien filings
  36. Research familial history
  37. Connect the dots
  38. Locate witnesses for a civil or criminal lawsuit
  39. Interview witnesses for a civil or criminal lawsuit
  40. Find assets
  41. Find current or historical boat registrations
  42. Find current or historical aircraft registrations
  43. Search for hidden assets
  44. Conduct business intelligence
  45. Discreet intelligence gathering
  46. Determine connections between parties
  47. Locate bank account information
  48. Locate current or former employees of a company
  49. Interview current or former employees of a company
  50. Locate significant inheritances
  51. Show you the big picture
  52. Identify a will for an estate
  53. Locate probate records
  54. Identify foreign assets
  55. Locate regulatory records
  56. Identify regulatory actions
  57. Identify professional licenses
  58. Determine prior disciplinary records for professional licenses
  59. Analyze state and federal political contributions
  60. Analyze state lobbyist records
  61. Analyze federal lobbyist records
  62. Identify potential whistleblowers
  63. Vet expert witnesses
  64. Interview industry sources
  65. Gather competitive intelligence
  66. Identify related party business transactions
  67. Retrieve and analyze non-profit financial filings
  68. Knock on doors
  69. Obtain and analyze Department of Labor Form 5500 Filings
  70. Submit FOIA / FOIL requests to government agencies
  71. Obtain driving record history (in applicable states)
  72. Find current vehicle registrations
  73. Find historical vehicle registrations
  74. Make you look brilliant
  75. Determine current market value of motor vehicles
  76. Assist with jury selection
  77. Background checks on prospective jurors
  78. Analyze documents for potential fraud
  79. Identify Risks
  80. Identifying corporate relationships
  81. Give you a competitive advantage
  82. Identify Uniform Commercial Code filings
  83. Foreign corporation research
  84. Help you manage sensitive situations
  85. Overseas litigation research
  86. Identify stock ownership
  87. Find facts
  88. Locate online resume
  89. Identify online networking profiles
  90. Locate historical video or news footage
  91. Conduct historical newspaper research
  92. Conduct mobile or stationary surveillance
  93. Perform clandestine operations
  94. Find undisclosed ties
  95. Identify and retrieve U.S. Tax Court cases
  96. Locate a missing person
  97. Identify and confirm education history
  98. Identify and confirm previous employment history
  99. Scour the Internet
  100. Research presence on social networks or message boards

For more tips, please follow us here: www.triplejinvestigations.com 

Johnny James,

Owner / CEO

Parking Lot Safety

Parking lot safety should have a high awareness for customers, workers, and owners; they can be a safety risk for anyone, especially in poorly lit areas.

When returning to your vehicle, especially if it is after dark or your arms are full of bags, try to be accompanied by someone else, such as a friend, co-worker, or security officer, then use your vehicle to drop them back off at the door. If they are unable to accompany you for some reason (as some companies do not allow co-workers carrying bank deposit bags to leave the building together), have them watch you from inside the building until you get to your vehicle; once you have reached it, park your vehicle where the headlights shine from the door to your co-worker’s vehicle, and watch them until they make it to their car. Then, both of you leave the parking lot at the same time in different directions.

If you are alone, or unable to be accompanied, a few ideas to keep in mind are:

·         Keep your keys out and ready to use – you do not want to have to stop and dig through a purse or a pocket to find your keys.

·         Park near lights, the parking attendant (if there is one), and as close to the door as possible. These 3 things will make you a less appealing target to anyone planning some form of trouble.

·         Don’t walk between vehicles. This makes it very easy for someone to trap you, come up behind you, or grab your ankle if they are under another vehicle. Walk down the aisles, as this way you can see between cars. Keep your body out of reach of anyone lying in wait and cannot be backed into a corner.

·         Pay attention to large vans with sliding doors that are parked next to you. It is incredibly easy for someone to open a sliding door, grab their victim to pull them inside the van, and then shut the sliding door before anyone else knows anything has happened. If there is a van with a sliding door parked next to your driver’s side door, either enter through the passenger door or return to the building and wait for the van to leave.

·         Lock your doors as soon as you enter the vehicle and drive away. Research has shown that individuals (especially women) will sit in their vehicles after they have entered them, either making a phone call or text message, applying make-up or fixing their hair, or eating. This gives a perpetrator time to make and execute a plan to reach you, especially if the doors are unlocked; don’t give them this opportunity.

 

If you are a business owner with a substantial parking lot, an investment to consider is hiring a security company to provide security guards for your parking lots and garages. Knowing that your parking area is safe for customers and employees can be a selling point to drive up traffic numbers and keep everyone protected at the same time.

For more tips, please follow us here: www.triplejinvestigations.com 

Jamie Dean,

Social Media / Recruiting Specialist

Employee Theft

            Dealing with employee theft can be a disheartening and complicated situation. However, there are ways to make a bad situation easier, depending on how it is handled; you also want to make sure that you do not accidently open yourself or your company to litigation or rebuttals during the legal process. The standard policies and procedures that your company has in place regarding employee theft are essential – they need to cover exactly what ‘theft’ consists of (including employee time theft) and the consequences and legal repercussions of committing the act. This also allows you to avoid the word ‘theft’, which is a potential issue that can lead to a slander lawsuit. It is much better to be able to call the occurrence a ‘policy violation’ when discussing it with the employee themselves or in a legal setting.

             Here are 6 tips to keep in mind if you find yourself in this situation:

1.      Verify that you have proof – video proof is obviously the most reliable and irrefutable. However, if it is unavailable, eyewitness testimony can also be used. Nevertheless, if going that route, make sure you have more than one witness to help prevent claims of sabotage or ‘being framed’.

2.      Prepare for the next step – after verifying that theft has been occurring, you will probably want to terminate the employee. However, before taking this step, make sure you are prepared. Double check your policy and procedure manual to make sure that what was happening was against written policy. Also check to see if the employee had a contract with a termination clause in it that could impact the proceedings. If the employee in question has a key and/or alarm code, be prepared to have the locks changed and the employee removed from the ‘allowed’ list.

3.      Do not Discuss It – While it may be necessary to discuss the action of terminating the employee with another staff member, such as your Human Resources Manager, refrain from talking about the situation with anyone else, including asking questions. It may be tempting to want to speak to the individual’s supervisor or co-workers in an attempt to find out the truth, but this could be seen as ‘gossiping’ and lead to an eroding of trust in other team members. It could also have legal ramifications, such as a slander suit if the theft is unable to be proven.

4.      Notify the police – This step depends on many factors, including company policy, personal opinion, and value of the item stolen. However,

5.      Do not deduct from the employee’s final paycheck – while it may be tempting to collect what was stolen back from the employee by taking it from the final check, this should be avoided. Some states do not allow for recompense of this kind, and could lead to larger fees and legal trouble than what you would get attempting to collect what was stolen through a court of law.

6.      Consider the future – You want to guarantee that your workplace is safe for both yourself and your other employees. If the terminated employee left angry or embarrassed, refused to sign termination paperwork, or made any type of threat, take precautions. As was stated in step 3, make sure the locks on all doors have been changed, the alarm company has been notified to void their security code, and (once the termination has taken place) other employees know not to let the individual into the building. Another option that should be considered would be hiring a security guard; if you do not already have in-house security, hiring a security company to provide guards for inside the building or a scheduled patrol for the property can be a smart investment, as it is much preferable to prevent retaliation than to deal with the aftermath of damage to yourself, your employees, or your merchandise and property.

 

There are many other steps in the process of dealing with employee theft, including the emotional damage of broken trust from someone that you hired, that need to be considered and dealt with. However, this list is a comprehensive starting point for navigating your way through a sticky security situation.

For more tips, please follow us here: www.triplejinvestigations.com 

Jamie Dean,

Social Media / Recruiting Specialist

Personal Security

            Personal security is a topic that is generally at the forefront of everyone’s mind, especially in the current social climate. Knowing how to protect yourself, your loved ones, and your assets is not just a luxury, it is a necessity. While most property can be replaced, the same is not true of people, and can have a devastating effect on an individual’s mental health and sense of security. In this section, we are going to look at some of the basic personal safety tips you can use to increase your personal security:

·         Prevent access – keep windows and doors locked, at home, in the office, and in the car. It can be difficult to form the habit if it is not already established, especially if you live and work in a safe neighborhood, but it only takes once for a tragedy to occur.

·         Be aware of your surroundings – An estimated 3 in 1,000 people were victims of aggravated assault in 2015. Of these, 56% of women reported that they were either home or close to their home at the time of the assault. Comparatively, 43% of men reported that they were in a parking lot, commercial place, or other public area at the time of assault[1].

·         Minimize leverage – try to reduce the number of places and things an attacker could use to grab you; women with long hair (up or down either one) are more likely to be attacked than a woman with short hair, simply due to a lack of handholds. Avoid long or dangling jewelry, such as earrings or nose rings that can be used to control your movements. Belt loops are also another place an attacker could grab to keep you from fleeing.

·         Be prepared to defend yourself – we have all heard the adage of walking with your keys between your fingers; while this is certainly helpful if there are no other options, you don’t want to have to depend on having an arm free and good enough aim to manage to get away. Make sure to carry with you something you can use to defend yourself, such as pepper spray or a taser. If you prefer an option that is a bit more passive, an alarm that hangs on your keychain and can be activated quickly and easily is a good option. There are many personal protection items for sale, and a quick search will help you find one that suits your needs.

·         Always check your backseat – as noted in tip 2, parking lots can be a hotspot for assaults. Make sure you check your backseat before getting into your car to verify there is no-one waiting to ambush you.

·         Last resort – As a last resort, make sure that you always tell someone where you are going and that your cell phone’s tracking option is turned ON. Whether taken against your will, or forced into unconsciousness, having a way for loved ones and law enforcement to have an idea of where you were and the ability to track your whereabouts should be a priority. Even if your cell phone is thrown out or destroyed, they would be able to see where the signal stopped and canvas the area.

While these are just a few of the ways the average individual can help protect themselves, there is always a chance that things will move beyond the stage of ‘opportunity’. If you have been a victim of persistent and malicious activity by someone, you do have the option of hiring a bodyguard. While a good personal protection specialist can be an investment, it is without a doubt worth it for the peace of mind it brings to have a trained individual whose sole purpose is to keep you safe.

For more tips, please follow us here: www.triplejinvestigations.com 

Jamie Dean,

Social Media / Recruiting Specialist

 


[1] Crime Type – Violent Crime. (2017). Retrieved January 28, 2021, from https://www.bjs.gov/index.cfm?ty=tp&tid=31